Nicholas J. Klein

Nicholas J. Klein's research contributes to two central areas of transportation planning: understanding the factors that influence how people travel on a daily basis, and how these changes play out over the course of their lives. His work focuses on marginalized populations and neighborhoods that use transit, walk, and bike at high rates. By studying factors that influence how people in these communities travel on a daily basis and how their travel evolves over many years, his work offers new perspectives for planners, policymakers, and researchers on issues of equity and sustainability in transportation.

He received his Ph.D. from the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University, a master's degree in urban spatial analytics from the University of Pennsylvania, and a bachelor's degree in operations research and industrial engineering from Cornell University. Klein previously taught at Columbia University, Temple University, and Pratt Institute.

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Classes (Selected)

  • CRP 3210: Intro to Quantitative Methods for the Analysis of Public PolicyThis course provides an introduction to several methods for analyzing policies and situations that require a policy response. The methods considered-systems modeling, queuing modeling, benefit-cost analysis, decision analysis, multi-criteria analysis, urban and regional analysis-are widely used by planning practitioners and policy analysts (e.g., economists, budget analysts, public administrators, and civil engineers) and embody modalities of thought that often structure the ways that issues are framed for public discussions and policy decisions. Students who complete this course satisfactorily will obtain working knowledge of the methods considered, and become educated consumers of studies in which these methods are employed. CRP 3210 is a "second course" in quantitative reasoning, meaning that students should have a good command of high school algebra and have successfully completed courses in introductory statistics and principles of economic analysis.

Awards, Grants, and Fellowships (Selected)

  • Principal investigator, "Evaluating Select Bus Service in New York City," TransitCenter (2017)
  • American Sociological Association's Community and Urban Sociology Section Student Paper Award (for "Everything but the chickens") (2012)
  • Co-principal investigator, "Strategies to improve immigrants' access to the planning of public transportation," with Evelyn Blumenberg (UCLA) and Michael Smart (UCLA). Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation Participation Program (2010–13)
  • New Jersey Department of Transportation Research Award (2009)
  • Co-principal investigator, "The impact of low-cost buses on the transit industry," with Dan Chatman (University of California–Berkeley). Transportation Coordinating Council, FTA Research Grant Program, Rutgers University (2008–10)

Exhibitions and Presentations (Selected)

  • Michael Smart and Nicholas Klein,"Remembrance of cars and buses past: How prior life experiences influence travel," at the 96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC (January 2017)
  • Michael Smart and Nicholas Klein, "Transport and housing expenditures: Muddying the relationship," at the 96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC (January 2017)
  • Nicholas Klein, Michael Smart, and Erick Guerra, the 56th Annual Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Conference, Portland, Oregon (November 2016)

Publications (Selected)

  • Nicholas J. Klein and Michael Smart, "Millennials and Car Ownership: Less Money, Fewer Cars," Transport Policy 53 (January 2017): 20–29. doi: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2016.08.010
  • Nicholas J. Klein and Michael Smart, "Travel behavior among same-sex couples," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice 90 (2016): 1–13
  • Daniel G. Chatman, Robert B. Noland, and Nicholas J. Klein, "Firm births, access to transit, and agglomeration in Portland, Oregon, and Dallas, Texas," Transportation Research Record 2598 (2016): 1–10