Wynne Greenwood: Why Pause Now?

Wynne Greenwood lecture
More Heads, digital video with sound. photo / courtesy of the artist and Fourteen30 Contemporary, Portland
Wynne Greenwood lecture
On October 13, Wynne Greenwood gave a lecture titled "Why Pause Now" in the Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium. William Staffeld / AAP
Wynne Greenwood lecture
Wynne Greenwood during her lecture in the Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium. William Staffeld / AAP
Wynne Greenwood lecture
Wynne Greenwood responding to student questions during the post-lecture Q&A session. William Staffeld / AAP
More Heads, digital video with sound. photo / courtesy of the artist and Fourteen30 Contemporary, Portland On October 13, Wynne Greenwood gave a lecture titled "Why Pause Now" in the Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium. William Staffeld / AAP Wynne Greenwood during her lecture in the Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium. William Staffeld / AAP Wynne Greenwood responding to student questions during the post-lecture Q&A session. William Staffeld / AAP

Wynne Greenwood is a Seattle-based video artist who also works with performance, music, and object-making. Her work explores the construction of self in relationship to group formation and process. From 1999 to 2006, Greenwood performed in the multimedia art band, Tracy + the Plastics. In 2014, she re-performed the project's 19 performances, creating new documentation for a comprehensive archive. Recent solo exhibitions include Kelly at the New Museum, New York City; Stacy at the Cooley Gallery, Reed College; and Tracy + the Plastics at Fanta Spazio, Milan. Past exhibitions include the Tate Modern, London; the 2004 Whitney Biennial, New York City; The Kitchen, New York City; the Frye Art Museum, Seattle; Susanne Vielmetter, Los Angeles; Soloway, Brooklyn; Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; and Lawrimore Project, Seattle. Greenwood currently teaches at Seattle University.

In 2003, Greenwood wrote "Can You Pause that for a Second... and let yourself groove," an essay that positioned the space of a paused video as a site of participation, not disengagement. In this talk, she will return to the pause, looking for how it shows up in our media landscapes today and how (and why) it might be useful now.

Supported by the Tenaglia family.
Related Links
Tracy and the Plastics