Student Work Displayed at Sixth International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam

Student work at Rotterdam biennial
Drawings and models from the Right of Way_QueensWay, NY studio was on display at the sixth International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam in August. photo / provided
Student work at Rotterdam biennial
Six models from Hwang and Moon's studio were part of the display at the 2014 IABR, "Urban by Nature." photo / provided
Drawings and models from the Right of Way_QueensWay, NY studio was on display at the sixth International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam in August. photo / provided Six models from Hwang and Moon's studio were part of the display at the 2014 IABR, "Urban by Nature." photo / provided
News
October 1, 2014

Work from a spring semester research and design initiative titled Right of Way, Reprogrammable City was displayed at the sixth International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam (IABR) over the summer.

Consisting of two distinct parts, Right of Way, led by visiting critics in architecture Nahyun Hwang and David Eugin Moon, explored historical and present notions of the public right of way and its future meanings in the contemporary city.

Part I of the project, completed as an independent study, involved research and mapping of both functioning and outdated municipal infrastructure zones in metropolitan New York City, and ideas for potential future public use of these areas. Students included Germain Chan (B.Arch. '14), Jonathan Negron (B.Arch. '14), Youngjin Yi (M.Arch. '14), Ka Leung Yuen (M.Arch. '15), and Stephanie Zhao (M.Arch. '15).

Part II was an option studio titled Right of Way_QueensWay, NY. Six final projects encompassing the entire 3.5-mile length of the QueensWay, an abandoned railway bisecting Queens along the communities of Rego Park, Forest Hills, Forest Park, Richmond Hill, Woodhaven, and Ozone Park, demonstrated how the area might be turned into valuable civic space through spatial interventions and reprogramming. The six projects were represented on a collaborative, large-scale drawing and models that were displayed at the biennial.

Students in the studio included Saejun Ahn (B.Arch. '14), Saira Akhtar (M.Arch. '15), Rachel Bacus (B.Arch. '15), Yuxin Cao (M.Arch. '14), Helena Daher Gomes '14, Karim Daw (B.Arch. '15), Aaron Goldstein (B.Arch. '15), Timothy Ho (M.Arch. '14), Jun Yeon Kim (B.Arch. '15), Richard Nelson-Chow (B.Arch. '15), Binh Nguyen (B.Arch. '15), Mary Palumbo (M.Arch. '15), Vincent Parlatore (B.Arch. '15), and Arsalan Rafique (M.Arch. '14).

The 2014 IABR, titled "Urban by Nature," examined the way architecture tackles urban challenges by analyzing the relationship between urban society and nature, and between city and landscape. Held every two years around critical themes in the discourse of architecture and urbanism, previous editions of the IABR engaged topics such as: Power, Producing the Contemporary City; Making City; and Open City, Designing Coexistence. The 2014 IABR was held at the Kunsthal in Rotterdam, the Netherlands from May 29 to August 24.

By Rebecca Bowes