Petra Kempf: Crossing Lines II

A view of Petra Kempf's exhibition Crossing Lines ll in Bibliowicz Family Gallery, Milstein Hall.
A view of Petra Kempf's exhibition Crossing Lines ll in Bibliowicz Family Gallery, Milstein Hall.
Exhibition view.
Exhibition view.
Exhibition description.
Exhibition description.
Exhibition view.
Exhibition view.
The work of Petra Kempf.
The work of Petra Kempf.
Exhibition view.
Exhibition view.
The work of Petra Kempf.
The work of Petra Kempf.
A view of Petra Kempf's exhibition Crossing Lines ll in Bibliowicz Family Gallery, Milstein Hall. Exhibition view. Exhibition description. Exhibition view. The work of Petra Kempf. Exhibition view. The work of Petra Kempf.

In Dialogues Two, written in 1987, Gilles Deleuze made the case that “It is never the beginning or the end which are interesting; the beginning and the end are points. What is interesting is the middle.” Translated to the act of drawing, this statement suggests that the line — the most basic aspect of drawing — is not about its beginning and end points, but about the middle, the in-between.

The line can therefore be an agent representing the in-between, through which the process of constant becoming unfolds. Thus, the act of drawing may be perceived as something temporal and dynamic — a concept in which the line embodies a process that is forever adjusting, always dynamic, in motion. The points themselves no longer determine the course of the path; the line between does. It is in action.

Crossing Lines II explores the unfolding of place through the act of drawing. Each drawing sets out to record passages through time — pathways that form a journey in which a subject is continually crossing a line to bring forward place. As place unfolds, so is the line, in a continuous process, forever changing, adjusting to new situations. With each new moment arising, new lines are being crossed, new positions are being "negotiated" — both in space and time. Crossing Lines is the ongoing investigation of inhabiting a liminal space in transit through which one marks, transforms and negotiates new positions — a process by which we continually reposition ourselves. It is from this vantage point that the subject interprets, memorizes, and records the constant becoming of place. Accordingly, each drawing resembles a moment in time that comes together from diverse sources, assembled into an overlay of various impressions, whose constellations cannot be controlled or attributed to a universal rational. While the subject translates fragments of the perceived environment into lines, new stories unfold — stories that will give rise to a different understanding and perception of a place.

 
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