Martin Miller Wins Design Competition with Pussy Hut

Giant pink pussy hat as a shelter for 3 people and benches on snow with trees in the background
Pussy Hut, work by Martin Miller and Mo Zheng, was built over a lifeguard station on the Toronto waterfront. rendering / provided
Two people walking on a snow-covered beach and a large pink pussy hat in the foreground casting a shadow
Pussy Hut was "knitted" at scale using tubular stockinettes stuffed with recycled foam. rendering / provided
Pussy Hut, work by Martin Miller and Mo Zheng, was built over a lifeguard station on the Toronto waterfront. rendering / provided Pussy Hut was "knitted" at scale using tubular stockinettes stuffed with recycled foam. rendering / provided
News
June 20, 2018

Pussy Hut, an oval pavilion fabricated in the style of the pink pussy hats made famous during the Women's March in January 2017, took first place in Winter Stations, an annual international design competition. The winners of Winter Stations create temporary, outdoor public art installations in Toronto, Canada.

The installation is the work of Professor of the Practice Martin Miller, architecture, and Mo Zheng. Miller and Zheng are coprincipals of Antistatics Architecture Design based in New York City and Beijing. Pussy Hut was built of robotic computer numerical control (CNC) machine-milled plywood and two-centimeter wide "yarn" — tubular "stockinettes" stuffed with recycled foam off-cuts — and installed over an inhabitable hat stand. Visitors to the installation were encouraged to leave symbols of strength and perseverance for display within the pavilion and to write on the walls inscriptions about their heroines and mentors in the march towards equal rights for women.

The Winter Stations competition theme for this year was "Riot," defined as "violent disturbance; uproar; outburst of uncontrolled feelings; a large or varied display." Lifeguard stations on the eastern beach of Toronto's Lake Ontario waterfront were used as the armature for the temporary installations, which were designed to withstand the winter weather. In its fourth year, this year's competition winners were announced in January, and the exhibition ran from February 19 to April 1.

A similar CNC fabrication process was used in the collaborative work Primitive Hut, a pavilion at Art Omi in Ghent, New York, that was a collaboration between Antistatics and Edgar A. Tafel Associate Professor Caroline O'Donnell's firm CODA.