Iñaqui Carnicero Presents Architectural Interventions in India and New York City

Round table discussion at interior design conference in Indore, India
Carnicero, far left, joined panelists in a round table discussion at the National Convention of the Institute of Indian Interior Designers in Indore, India. photo / provided
Iñaqui Carnicero presented a lecture at interior design conference in Indore, India
Carnicero presents a lecture at the National Convention of the Institute of Indian Interior Designers in Indore, India. photo / provided
Iñaqui Carnicero at Storefront for the Arts in New York
"Unfinished," at Storefront for the Arts in New York City, was cocurated by Carnicero and Carlos Quintans. photo / provided
Carnicero, far left, joined panelists in a round table discussion at the National Convention of the Institute of Indian Interior Designers in Indore, India. photo / provided Carnicero presents a lecture at the National Convention of the Institute of Indian Interior Designers in Indore, India. photo / provided "Unfinished," at Storefront for the Arts in New York City, was cocurated by Carnicero and Carlos Quintans. photo / provided
News
April 15, 2016

In February, visiting assistant professor in architecture Iñaqui Carnicero presented a lecture at the 11th National Convention of the Institute of Indian Interior Designers. More than 2,000 delegates from across the world attended the three-day event in Indore, India. The convention's theme, "Taking Design to the Masses," addressed rising trends in interior design in India's fast growing economy.

Carnicero's lecture, "Small Actions, Big Impact," focused on Rome as a precedent of how a city may be built and destroyed over time while reusing almost the same raw materials. He demonstrated how projects that his firm has undertaken have "transformed cities' economic and political constraints into assets," whether in boom times or downturns, and placed sustainability in the context of a building's functional behavior over time.

In keeping with that same transformation was "Unfinished," an event held in March at Storefront for the Arts in New York City, cocurated by Carnicero and Carlos Quintans, with visiting assistant professor in architecture Lorena del Río joining the design team. The event was part of Storefront for the Arts Manifesto Series, which seeks to "encourage the formulation of positions, and instigate spirited discussion and exchange in a dynamic and polemical context."

For Carnicero, the "Unfinished" manifesto epitomized "a new type of architectural intervention, where architects become a link in the chain of a structure's life, leaving an important but impermanent mark on the built environment."

"The act of creating new objects from scratch is often no longer possible for the professional architect given the social and economic contexts of our contemporary world," says Carnicero. "A contradiction thus exists between the architecture commonly presented by the media as finished forms frozen in time, and architecture that has the capacity to evolve, adapt, and transform. This latter type of architecture, which is perpetually 'unfinished,' allows for a different understanding of time."

Support for the event was provided in part by AAP.

Carnicero has been an associate professor of design at the School of Architecture, Polytechnic University of Madrid since 2000, and joined AAP's architecture faculty four years ago. He is cofounder of the architecture platform "Symmetries," relating Roman and contemporary procedures.

By Patti Witten