Gerardo Francisco Sandoval: Defending the Barrio: Gentrification, Resistance, and Neighborhood Cultural Identity

Chicano Park in San Diego
Chicano Park in San Diego. photo / provided
Gerardo Francisco Sandoval lecturing in front of a screen
Gerardo Francisco Sandoval lecturing in the Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium. William Staffeld / AAP
Gerardo Francisco Sandoval talking with students
Gerardo Francisco Sandoval responds to student questions during the "talk back" session in room 115 West Sibley Hall. William Staffeld / AAP
Gerardo Francisco Sandoval talks with students
Gerardo Francisco Sandoval with CRP students during the "talk back" session. William Staffeld / AAP
Chicano Park in San Diego. photo / provided Gerardo Francisco Sandoval lecturing in the Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium. William Staffeld / AAP Gerardo Francisco Sandoval responds to student questions during the "talk back" session in room 115 West Sibley Hall. William Staffeld / AAP Gerardo Francisco Sandoval with CRP students during the "talk back" session. William Staffeld / AAP

Gerardo Francisco Sandoval is an associate professor in the Department of Planning, Public Policy, and Management at the University of Oregon. His research focuses on the roles of immigrants in community regeneration, the urban planning interventions of governments in low-income immigrant communities, and the transnational relationships that exists within immigrant neighborhoods. Sandoval's books include Immigrants and the Revitalization of Los Angeles: Development and Change in MacArthur Park, which received honorable mention for ACSP's Paul Davidoff Award, and Biking Justice and Urban Transformations: Biking for All? Sandoval has published in journals focused on urban planning and community development such as the Journal of Planning Education and Research, Urban Studies, Community Development, and the Journal of Urbanism. He received his Ph.D. in city and regional planning from the University of California–Berkeley.

Abstract:

Sandoval examines how four Latino low-income neighborhoods resist gentrification pressures as large-scale, transit-oriented, redevelopment projects threaten these neighborhoods. The study is situated within debates of transportation justice and urban cultural identity politics. The consequent transformation of these transit-oriented development projects to incorporate equity concerns and issues of cultural identity provides avenues for mitigating gentrification concerns in the neighborhoods. The neighborhoods studied are the Fruitvale in Oakland, Boyle Heights and MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, and Logan Heights in San Diego. These in-depth neighborhood case studies contribute to the planning field as planners grapple with conflicts generated via their public transit and "affordable housing" investments in low-income ethnic neighborhoods. The stories and struggles of resistance that emerged from these threatened neighborhoods provide a deeper understanding of contemporary spatial urban change in a new globalized context of translocal migration and changing cultural preferences based on sustainability. 

Sponsored by the Russell Van Nest Black Lectureship Fund.