Dark Rooms 1: Pyramid Studio Exhibition

Dark Rooms 1: Pyramid
drawing / Clara Eizayaga
Dark Rooms 1: Pyramid
Work by Sasson Rafailov (B.Arch. '18) for the Dark Rooms studio. photo / Sasson Rafailov
Dark Rooms 1: Pyramid Studio Exhibition
Kate Chen (B.Arch. '18) with her blacklight piece for Pyramid. William Staffeld / AAP
Dark Rooms 1: Pyramid Studio Exhibition
Students explore the displays during the reception for the Darkrooms 1: Pyramid studio exhibition. William Staffeld / AAP
Dark Rooms 1: Pyramid Studio Exhibition
A scene from the reception for the Darkrooms 1: Pyramid studio exhibition. William Staffeld / AAP
Dark Rooms 1: Pyramid Studio Exhibition
An installation for the Darkrooms 1: Pyramid studio exhibition. William Staffeld / AAP
drawing / Clara Eizayaga Work by Sasson Rafailov (B.Arch. '18) for the Dark Rooms studio. photo / Sasson Rafailov Kate Chen (B.Arch. '18) with her blacklight piece for Pyramid. William Staffeld / AAP Students explore the displays during the reception for the Darkrooms 1: Pyramid studio exhibition. William Staffeld / AAP A scene from the reception for the Darkrooms 1: Pyramid studio exhibition. William Staffeld / AAP An installation for the Darkrooms 1: Pyramid studio exhibition. William Staffeld / AAP

Pyramid is the first in a series of three exhibitions of work from the Dark Rooms studio, taught by Visiting Assistant Professor Mona Mahall. The studio explores dark rooms as spaces between visibility and invisibility, where they are dense, thick, and deep, where figure dissolves into ground, where ambiguity and uncertainty emerge. Dark rooms imply methodologies and epistemologies that oppose the clear, enlightened space of modern universalist architecture. If this space of visibility, of transparency, and perspective implies a framework of objectivity and scientificity, dark rooms propagate the right to be opaque. The pyramid, the server room, and backstage are in the focus of interest.

The pyramid marks the monument per se; this pure, spiritual, quasi-eternal form has been of interest as a sculptural object rather than as a continuum of interior dark rooms that were originally thought of as apartments for the afterlife. The exhibition shows the pyramid turned inside out, its excavated dark rooms, anti-monument analysis, and work on its segmentation, division, and conceptual deconstruction.

This exhibition features works by Kate Chen (B.Arch. '18), Clara Eizayaga (B.Arch. '18), Anna Kuchera (B.Arch. '18), Brad Nathanson (B.Arch. '18), Sasson Rafailov (B.Arch. '18), Sean Steed (B.Arch. '18), Beth Tesfaye (B.Arch. '18), Daniel Tompkins (B.Arch. '17), Luba Valkova (B.Arch. '17), and Frank Wang (B.Arch. '18).