Claire McClinton: Labor Leader, Water Warrior, and Champion of Democracy

Claire McClinton Talk Back
Claire McClinton responds to student questions during her "talk back" session after the public lecture. William Staffeld / AAP
Claire McClinton lecture
CRP's Professor Mildred Warner, during her introduction of Claire McClinton in the Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium. William Staffeld / AAP
Claire McClinton Talk Back
M.R.P. students listen to Claire McClinton during the "talk back" session. William Staffeld / AAP
Claire McClinton Talk Back
Professor Mildred Warner, at left, joins Claire McClinton as she responds to student questions during the "talk back" session. William Staffeld / AAP
Claire McClinton Talk Back
Claire McClinton during the "talk back" session. William Staffeld / AAP
Claire McClinton responds to student questions during her "talk back" session after the public lecture. William Staffeld / AAP CRP's Professor Mildred Warner, during her introduction of Claire McClinton in the Abby and Howard Milstein Auditorium. William Staffeld / AAP M.R.P. students listen to Claire McClinton during the "talk back" session. William Staffeld / AAP Professor Mildred Warner, at left, joins Claire McClinton as she responds to student questions during the "talk back" session. William Staffeld / AAP Claire McClinton during the "talk back" session. William Staffeld / AAP

Claire McClinton was born and raised in Flint, Michigan, and is a UAW retiree who comes from a family of autoworkers. She has been in the thick of the battle for labor rights and against poverty in her city for decades, and she is currently in the thick of the fight for safe, clean water for all. Her work analyzes what the poisoning of a city's water — and the toxic system behind it — means for the entire country. She will discuss the underlying conditions that have given rise to the poisoning — the profound changes in the economy that has eliminated jobs and devastated former industrial cities. She will also speak about the new model of corporate dictatorship in Michigan that has destroyed democracy as it takes over cities and towns and schools, silencing workers while taking over public assets like water. McClinton argues that it was the system of governor-appointed emergency managers that ushered in the change in Flint's water to the toxic Flint river, poisoning an entire American city. In addition, McClinton will discuss the kind of new society that there could be if the new technology that is today displacing so many workers is used for everyone's benefit.

Cosponsored by the Department of City and Regional Planning and the Development Sociology, Population, and Development Program.