B.Arch. Model Included in Bjarke Ingles Group Exhibit at National Building Museum

Denmark Pavilion by Daniel Toretsky and Allison Wills
Denmark Pavilion, by Daniel Toretsky (B.Arch. '16) and Allison Wills (B.Arch. '16), on display at the BIG exhibit. photo / Matt Carbone
BIG exhibit at the National Building Museum.
The video galleries of the HOT TO COLD exhibit house Denmark Pavilion. photo / Matt Carbone
BIG exhibit at the National Building Museum.
HOT TO COLD features three-dimensional models suspended above the second-floor balconies of the museum's historic Great Hall. photo / Matt Carbone
BIG exhibit at the National Building Museum.
The Great Hall in the National Building Museum. photo / Matt Carbone
Denmark Pavilion, by Daniel Toretsky (B.Arch. '16) and Allison Wills (B.Arch. '16), on display at the BIG exhibit. photo / Matt Carbone The video galleries of the HOT TO COLD exhibit house Denmark Pavilion. photo / Matt Carbone HOT TO COLD features three-dimensional models suspended above the second-floor balconies of the museum's historic Great Hall. photo / Matt Carbone The Great Hall in the National Building Museum. photo / Matt Carbone
News
February 12, 2015

A model by B.Arch. students Daniel Toretsky (B.Arch. '16) and Allison Wills (B.Arch. '16) is being featured in HOT TO COLD: an odyssey of architectural adaptation, a high profile exhibit produced by Bjarke Ingles Group (BIG) at the National Building Museum on view until August.

The exhibition takes visitors from the hottest to the coldest parts of the planet and explores how BIG's design solutions are shaped by their cultural and climatic contexts. Offering a behind-the-scenes look at its creative process, more than 60 three-dimensional models are suspended above the second-floor balconies of the museum's historic Great Hall in an unprecedented use of the public space.

Toretsky and Wills's work Denmark Pavilion was initially created for the class Structural Systems taught by Department Chair and Nathaniel and Margaret Owings Professor of Architecture Mark Cruvellier. The class asks students to investigate and represent the primary overall structural system of any existing building. Toretsky and Wills selected BIG's Danish pavilion from the 2010 Shanghai Expo.

"We chose to investigate the Danish pavilion because it uses a highly repetitive structural bay in a very non-traditional manner," says Toretsky. "Because no drawings were provided by the designers, we built a digital model parametrically using Rhinoceros and Grasshopper to aid in the fabrication process."

Denmark Pavilion was on display in the Rand shop window when Wills and Toretsky's former TA, Karen Chi-Chi Lin (B.Arch. '13), visited campus. Currently working for BIG, Lin asked the pair to donate the model to the exhibition.

"We are so honored to be a part of BIG's exhibition," says Wills. "It's satisfying to receive recognition for our work at such a renowned institution as the National Building Museum. And it's nice that the model isn't just gathering sawdust in the shop!"

Says Cruvellier, "Allison and Daniel's model . . . easily ranks among the many exceptional student projects that have been built here over the years for the Structural Systems class. For this work to now to be on the national stage is certainly testament to this project's truly remarkable qualities. Daniel and Alison are deserving of our congratulations on having achieved such recognition."

By Rebecca Bowes