Kris Hartley

Kris Hartley's teaching and research interests include economic development, urban growth, and environmental policy. He first became interested in cities while studying ancient Minoan settlements as an archaeological fieldworker in Crete. His interest has since skipped ahead to modern Asian cities, in particular, the economic, social, and environmental impacts of rapid urbanization.

Hartley has consulted with government agencies in North America and Asia on issues such as affordable housing, earthquake recovery, and infrastructure development. He has held visiting academic appointments at the University of Hong Kong, Seoul National University, Vietnam National University, and the University of the Philippines. His current research projects address FDI in Africa, climate change adaptation in Hong Kong, and ASEAN economic integration.

Hartley is a faculty fellow at Cornell's Atkinson Center. He also maintains research affiliations with the Center for New Structural Economics (Peking University), the Institute of Water Policy (NUS), and the Center for Government Competitiveness (Seoul National University). Additionally, he serves as a non-resident fellow for global cities at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Hartley received a B.A. (Phi Beta Kappa) in classics from the University of Tennessee, an M.B.A. from Baylor University, an M.C.P from the University of California–Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in public policy from the National University of Singapore.

Classes (Selected)

  • CRP 3210 Intro to Quantitative Methods for Analysis of Public PolicyThis course provides an introduction to several methods for analyzing policies and situations that require a policy response. The methods considered-systems modeling, queuing modeling, benefit-cost analysis, decision analysis, multi-criteria analysis, urban and regional analysis-are widely used by planning practitioners and policy analysts (e.g., economists, budget analysts, public administrators, and civil engineers) and embody modalities of thought that often structure the ways that issues are framed for public discussions and policy decisions. Students who complete this course satisfactorily will obtain working knowledge of the methods considered, and become educated consumers of studies in which these methods are employed. CRP 3210 is a "second course" in quantitative reasoning, meaning that students should have a good command of high school algebra and have successfully completed courses in introductory statistics and principles of economic analysis.
  • CRP 5120 Public and Spatial EconomicsCovers basic microeconomic theory in a manner that lets students understand the many applications of economics presented in subsequent courses in city and regional planning. Topics covered include the logic of markets and gains from trade; public goods and commons problems; externalities; and the economic approach to equity. 
  • CRP 5250 Intro to Methods of Planning AnalysisCovers basic microeconomic theory in a manner that lets students understand the many applications of economics presented in subsequent courses in city and regional planning. Topics covered include the logic of markets and gains from trade; public goods and commons problems; externalities; and the economic approach to equity. 
  • CRP 5852 Special Topics on Asian UrbanizationThis course addresses pertinent issues relative to the subject of urban history, society, and politics. Topics vary each semester.

Awards, Grants, and Fellowships (Selected)

  • President's Graduate Fellowship (National University of Singapore, 2012–16)
  • Research Grant (Center for New Structural Economics, Peking University, 2015)
  • Musim Mas Dissertation Award (School of Business, National University of Singapore, 2015)
  • Faculty Fellowship (Telluride House, Cornell University, 2016)

Publications (Selected)

  • "Foreign aid and good governance: modeling the counter-developmental equilibrium," with Justin Yifu Lin and Vu Minh Khuong, Development Policy Review (forthcoming)
  • "Policy Capacity in Governance Indices," with J. Zhang, in Howlett, Ramesh, and Wu (eds.), Policy Capacity: State and Societal Perspectives, London: Palgrave Macmillan (forthcoming)
  • Can Government Think? Flexible Economic Opportunism and the Pursuit of Government Competitiveness, (Routledge Press, 2014)