You are Invited: Cornell in Rome 30th Anniversary Celebration

Internationally known architect and scholar Peter Eisenman (B.Arch. '55) at the AAP NYC All Alumni Party in October 2016. Eisenman will speak at Cornell in Rome 30th Anniversary Celebration.
Cornell in Rome fieldtrip to Torino at Palazzo del Lavoro by Pier Luigi Nervi, fall 2016. photo / Jeannette E. Pang (B.Arch. ’19)
Noel Salinas (B.Arch. '06) visiting the Pope before the start of fall semester classes in August 2004. photo / Troy Rog-Urman (B.Arch. '06)
Students listen to professor Jeffrey Blanchard at world renowned Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, fall 2015. photo / Stephanie Cheung (B.Arch. '18)
Architecture students Adam Greene and Albert Lin sketching in Pompei, fall 2004. photo / Troy Rog-Urman (B.Arch. '06)
Architecture students Noel Salinas and Adam Greene sketching in Pompei, fall 2004. photo / Troy Rog-Urman (B.Arch. '06)
Victor Emmanuel II Monument, photo taken during the Cornell in Rome 20th anniversary weekend in 2006.
Cornell in Rome's 30th anniversary will be celebrated in March 2017. Meanwhile, each week, we are taking a trip down memory lane. IMAGE: Professor Jeffrey Blanchard (l) and William Cunningham ’73 (r) in The Royal Church of San Lorenzo, designed and built by Guarino Guarini between 1668–87. photo / Bob Joy (B.Arch. '72)
Students from the B.Arch. class of 2006 peering up at Torre Valesca during an excursion to Milan, September 2004. photo / Troy Rog-Urman (B.Arch. '06)
View of the Piazza San Marco, fall 2015. photo / Stephanie Cheung (B.Arch. '18)
Fall 2015 art class in Rome. photo / Anna Rita Flati
Architecture professor Jerry Wells (center) with two of the Cornell in Rome program founders; William McMinn (left) and Robert Einaudi (left), taken during the program’s 20th anniversary celebration. Wells will be leading tours during the 30th celebration in March.
Art students outside the Pantheon in Rome, fall 2003. photo / Anna Rita Flati
Professor George Hascup explains the architectural significance of Milan during the field trip to Northern Italy, fall 2015. photo / Stephanie Cheung (B.Arch. '18)
Students head to a gelateria after Italian class, fall 2015. photo / Stephanie Cheung (B.Arch. '18)
Urban and regional studies students in Milan, spring 2013. photo / Hannah Brockhaus (B.S. URS '14)
Spring 2016 Rome architecture studio. photo / Hung Vo (B.S. URS '17)
Susan Portman in Palazzo Massimo studio, summer 1988. photo / Susan Portman Price (B.S. URS '90, M.R.P. '91)
Sunny Lee in Palazzo Massimo studio, summer 1988. photo / Susan Portman Price (B.S. URS '90, M.R.P. '91)
Catie Ely, Serena Cheng, Jim Quinn, and Michaela Delasanta at Hadrian’s Villa, fall 2015. photo / Stephanie Cheung (B.Arch. '18)
AAP students sit outside a pasta restaurant, fall 2015. photo / Stephanie Cheung (B.Arch. '18)
1988 summer students in Palazzo Massimo studio including Sunny Lee, and Doug Gensler. photo / Susan Portman Price (B.S. URS '90, M.R.P. '91)
Students sketch, photograph, and explore the campus of Universita Bocconi, designed by Grafton Architects, fall 2015. photo / Stephanie Cheung (B.Arch. '18)
1988 summer students with director and teacher. photo / Susan Portman Price (B.S. URS '90, M.R.P. '91)
1988 summer program students in the Palazzo Massimo basement kitchen. photo / Susan Portman Price (B.S. URS '90, M.R.P. '91)
Field trip to Ostia Antica, summer 1986. photo / Anna Rita Flati
Rome art exhibition reception, spring 1999. photo / Anna Rita Flati
Students painting in the Rome studio, fall 2000. photo / Anna Rita Flati
In the art studio of Palazzo Massimo during the 1980's. Top row: Gieuseppe, James Ahn, Marie; Middle row: David Kim, me, Hadley, Gerville; Bottom: Nicole, Professor Beniniamo Placido, Ziad Aazan, Professor Charles Pearman. photo / Anna Rita Flati
The library in the Palazzo Santacroce, Cornell in Rome's new home. photo / provided
Spring 2013 Cornell in Rome field trip. photo / provided
Reception in the Palazzo Lazzaroni in 2011. photo / provided
A 2011 art studio in the Palazzo Lazzaroni. photo / provided
Students in the 2010 Cornell in Rome program. photo / provided
Cornell in Rome students 2010. photo / provided
Field trip to northern Italy in the spring of 2016. photo / Chris Andras (B.Arch. '18)
Pasta night with Anna Rita Flati (center, red apron). photo / Chris Andras (B.Arch. '18)
Students attend a lecture in the Palazzo Santacroce in the spring of 2016. photo / Chris Andras (B.Arch. '18)
A banner celebrating the 20th anniversary of Cornell in Rome in 2007. photo / provided
A celebration of the 20th anniversary of Cornell in Rome in 2007. photo / provided

Overview

Thank you to everyone who has registered — the response has been overwhelming! Registration is now closed. To be added to the wait list, please contact us via email at aapalum@cornell.edu or phone at (607) 255-7510.


Since the program's doors opened at Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne in 1987, Cornell in Rome has provided a transformative, semester-long experience for talented artists, architecture students, and urbanists. Led by faculty from AAP's Ithaca campus and internationally renowned visitors, and enriched by inspiring field trips to destinations around the city and throughout Italy, students often cite their Cornell in Rome semester as the highlight of their time at Cornell.

For three days in March, Cornell in Rome will celebrate its 30th anniversary with alumni, faculty, parents of current students, and friends. For program alumni, it's a chance to reunite with classmates and revisit the sites that made the experience so memorable. For others, it's an opportunity to experience a taste of the sites, sounds, culture, and learning environment that defines this exceptional international education program.

We hope you will join us!

  • Who: All AAP alumni, friends, and family
  • What: Tours, receptions, panels, and networking
  • Where: Rome, Italy
  • When: March 18–20, 2017

Learn more about Palazzo Santacroce, the new home of Cornell in Rome.

Panels

Thank you to everyone who has registered — the response has been overwhelming! Registration is now closed. To be added to the wait list, please contact us via email at aapalum@cornell.edu or phone at (607) 255-7510.

Saturday, March 18

Architecture panel: Rome as ground

  • Peter Eisenman (B.Arch. '55)
  • Patrik Schumacher, principal, Zaha Hadid Architects
  • Moderator: Kent Kleinman, Gale and Ira Drukier Dean of Architecture, Art, and Planning

Architects Peter Eisenman and Patrik Schumacher will reflect on the influence and inspiration of Rome in their built and speculative work, followed by a moderated conversation with Gale and Ira Drukier Dean Kent Kleinman. The session will meet at the Campidoglio in the Sala della Protomoteca.

Sunday, March 19

Humanities panel: Reading Buildings, Building Texts

  • Introduction: Michael Kotlikoff, provost, Cornell University
  • Don Randel, former Cornell provost, former president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and former president of the University of Chicago
  • Gretchen Ritter, Harold Tanner Dean of Cornell University's College of Arts and Sciences
  • Thomas J. Campanella, associate professor, Department of City and Regional Planning, College of Architecture, Art, and Planning, Cornell University
  • Verity Platt, associate professor, Department of Classics, College of Arts and Sciences, Cornell University
  • Kimberly Bowes, director, American Academy in Rome

A series of presentations and a panel discussion will focus on the intertwined practices of scholars in the humanities and practitioners of art and design, emphasizing the significance of direct material and spatial engagement for humanists and designers alike. The session will meet in the exquisite Villa Aurelia, with a reception following the presentations.

Tours

Thank you to everyone who has registered — the response has been overwhelming! Registration is now closed. To be added to the wait list, please contact us via email at aapalum@cornell.edu or phone at (607) 255-7510.


Each guest may attend three tours. Tours are limited to a maximum of 20 people. Schedule subject to change.

Jump to:

Saturday, March 18, 3–6 p.m.

Palazzo Colonna with Jeffrey Blanchard (walking tour)

This vast palace complex has been occupied and transformed by the Colonna family for more than 700 years and houses one of the world's most important privately owned art collections, especially rich in antique sculpture, Renaissance and Baroque painting, and princely furnishings of every sort. The tour includes the ground floor apartment of Princess Isabelle, as well as the piano nobile apartment with its spectacular Baroque long gallery.



Urban Space, Imperial Ideology with Jan Gadeyne (walking tour)

The Campus Martius has served diverse military, political, and cultural powers as an urban stage for propaganda, self-aggrandizement, entertainment, and legitimization. This tour will focus on the development of the Field of Mars during the reign of Augustus, including access to the interior of his mausoleum; the modifications and manipulations executed under Mussolini; and the contemporary foregrounding of the displaced Ara Pacis in the museum by Richard Meier.



Spectacle of Geometries with Andrea Simitch and Jerry Wells (bus to site)

This tour will focus on three prominent cultural complexes in the northern Flaminio district of the city, each a forceful formal expression intended to provide an alternative attractor to the historic core, both programmatically and architecturally. Sites include Zaha Hadid's MAXXI museum, Renzo Piano's Parco della Musica, and Odile Decq's MACRO museum.



The Marra/Moglia Collection and Jewish Ghetto with Shara Wasserman (walking tour)

The collection of Giovanni Moglia and Anna Marra offers a privileged view of blue-chip contemporary Italian art, including the work of Licia Galizia, Pietro Ruffo, Nunzio, Pizzi Cannella, and Staccioli. Housed in their private palazzina in the former Jewish Ghetto, the itinerary includes a tour of the district.



Cinematic Rome with Carolina Ciampaglia (walking tour)

La Dolce Vita (1960) and La Grande Bellezza (2014) are two well-known films that have greatly contributed to the international reputation of Rome as a site for making films. This tour will include sites that are prominent in one or the other film, such as the Palazzo Spada, Trevi Fountain, Palazzo Barberini, Via Veneto, Villa Medici, and Piazza del Popolo.



MAXXI Tour with Alessio Rosati (two-hour tour beginning at 11 a.m.; bus to site)

MAXXI is the National Museum of 21st Century Arts which, since its opening, has been one of the major international institutions collecting, preserving, and disseminating contemporary architecture and art. This tour will present the history of the museum and visit the spaces dedicated to both the permanent collection and the current temporary exhibitions.



Roma Fascista: Necessity and Grandeur with Anna Mascorella (bus to site)

Devised to resolve what Mussolini termed the problems of "necessity" and "grandeur," this two-part tour examines the fascist regime's expansive renovation of Rome. Part one (walking) traces the sventramenti (or demolitions) of the historic center, considering urban interventions such as the ex-Via dell'Impero (today's Via dei Fori Imperiali) and the Church of Santa Rita. Part two travels by bus to the Garbatella neighborhood to visit public housing complexes originally built to house those displaced during the city's redesign.

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Sunday, March 19, 10 a.m.–1p.m.

Trastevere and the Janiculum Hill with Jeffrey Blanchard (walking tour)

Crossing the Tiber River to Trastevere, this tour will visit the richly frescoed Renaissance interiors of the Villa Farnesina, created for the wealthy banker Agostino Chigi by a group of artists including Peruzzi and Raphael. After viewing the adjacent gardens of Palazzo Corsini, the tour will ascend the Janiculum Hill, and reach San Pietro in Montorio, the cloister of which houses one of the most iconic structures of the Renaissance — Donato Bramante's 1502 Tempietto.



Crypta Balbi with Jan Gadeyne (walking tour)

This tour will provide an introduction to the most important example of urban archaeology in Rome. The Crypta Balbi Museum covers the excavated remains of the Theater of Balbus, an archaeological site that forever changed our understanding of the transformation of the city from ancient capital to medieval town, after the "fall of the Roman empire."



Architectural Dialogs with Andrea Simitch and Jerry Wells (walking tour)

This itinerary explores the complex layers of cultural and material dialog that have informed architectural projects in some of the most sensitive historic sites in Rome. Starting with Michelangelo's restructuring of the Campidoglio, the tour will visit Pozzo's Corridoio and then proceed to the Capitoline Museums, focusing on Carlo Aymonino's adaptation of the former Giardino Romano to house the original Marcus Aurelius equestrian statue (Michelangelo's elliptical piazza is graced with a replica). The tour will conclude with a visit to Trajan's Markets, focusing on the contemporary architectural interventions in and around the Museo dei Fori imperiali (with architect Claudia Clemente and museum director Lucrezia Ungaro).



Rome Open Studio with Shara Wasserman (walking tour)

This tour will visit the Pastificio Cerere Foundation, a venue for the exhibition and promotion of contemporary art located in the San Lorenzo neighborhood. Established in 2005, the foundation is housed in the former Cerere pasta factory, a space appropriated and adapted to artists' studios. It was home to the 1980s San Lorenzo group — Nunzio and Piero Pizzi Cannella — and currently hosts a selection of prominent Roman artists, including Pietro Ruffo, Maurizio Savini, and Gianni Politi.



Fosse Ardeatine and Appian Way with Anna Mascorella (bus to site)

Spanning many centuries, this tour heads south of Rome's historic center and explores a range of monuments along the Appian Way. The tour will begin on the Via Ardeatina with the Monument to the Fosse Ardeatine, built in 1949 to memorialize the 335 Italians executed by Nazi forces in 1944. As the tour moves along the Appian Way, there will be visits to key vestiges of Ancient Rome, including the Villa and Circus of Maxentius and the Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella.



Making It: Pasta Making Workshop with Anna Rita Flati, lunch included

For three decades, Cornell in Rome's Administrative Director Anna Rita Flati has schooled Cornell students (and faculty and visiting parents) in the art of Italian cuisine. Flati will offer her famous, hands-on pasta workshop together with Chef Renato Astrologo in the kitchen of trattoria Renato e Luisa, one of Rome's best-kept restaurant secrets. Lunch included.



Palazzo Colonna with an official Palazzo Colonna tour guide

This vast palace complex has been occupied and transformed by the Colonna family for more than 700 years and houses one of the world's most important privately owned art collections, especially rich in antique sculpture, Renaissance and Baroque painting, and princely furnishings of every sort. The tour includes the ground floor apartment of Princess Isabelle, as well as the piano nobile apartment with its spectacular Baroque long gallery.

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Monday, March 20, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Two by Borromini with Jeffrey Blanchard (walking tour)

The tour focuses on two building complexes that are among the most important works of this Baroque master: the complex of the Oratorians, including the Biblioteca Vallicelliana; and the newly restored spaces occupied by the Capitoline Archive, followed by the Palazzo della Sapienza with the church of Sant'Ivo.



The Central Plan with Jan Gadeyne (bus to site)

The fourth-century reign of Constantine is typically associated with the rise of the basilica church plan, but a parallel architectural configuration evolved simultaneously, with roots in the central plan of the Pantheon. This tour will trace the evolution of the centralized floor plan in the fourth and fifth centuries, with visits to the Baptistery of St. John Lateran, Santo Stefano Rotondo, and the so-called Temple of Minerva Medica.



EUR: Desired Realities with Andrea Simitch and Jerry Wells (bus to site)

Exploring the "exquisite images of desired realities" (Ghirardo, 2013), this itinerary focuses on the district of the Esposizione Universale di Roma (EUR), developed originally in 1942 to glorify the fascist regime, then becoming home to the Olympics in 1960, and now a vibrant commercial, administrative, and residential center. Visits include the Palazzo dei Congressi (Libera), the Palazzo dello Sport (Nervi), the just completed EUR Convention Center and Hotel (Fuksas), and the iconic Palazzo della Civiltà del Lavoro ("Square Colosseum"), now the headquarters of the fashion house Fendi.



The Foro Italico with Anna Mascorella (bus to site)

Over the course of 20 years of fascism, Italy's regime constructed numerous architectural and urban projects across the city. This tour will explore one such project — the vast Foro Italico, a sports complex originally known as the Foro Mussolini. The Foro exists today largely unaltered and recently restored. The tour may include sites such as the so-called Mussolini Obelisk, the Piazzale dell'Impero, the Stadio dei Marmi, the Casa delle Armi/Accademia della Scherma, and the Palestra del Duce.



Making It: Pasta Making Workshop with Anna Rita Flati, lunch included

For three decades, Cornell in Rome's Administrative Director Anna Rita Flati has schooled Cornell students (and faculty and visiting parents) in the art of Italian cuisine. Flati will offer her famous, hands-on pasta workshop together with Chef Renato Astrologo in the kitchen of trattoria Renato e Luisa, one of Rome's best-kept restaurant secrets. Lunch included.



Rome Open Studio with Shara Wasserman (walking tour)

This tour will visit the Pastificio Cerere Foundation, a venue for the exhibition and promotion of contemporary art located in the San Lorenzo neighborhood. Established in 2005, the foundation is housed in the former Cerere pasta factory, a space appropriated and adapted to artists' studios. It was home to the 1980s San Lorenzo group — Nunzio and Piero Pizzi Cannella — and currently hosts a selection of prominent Roman artists, including Pietro Ruffo, Maurizio Savini, and Gianni Politi.

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Monday, March 20, 3–6 p.m.

The Rhetoric of the Counter-Reformation with Jeffrey Blanchard (walking tour)

The counter-reformation introduced an architectural and artistic language of heightened spectacle and theatricality. This tour will visit three representative counter-reformation churches: the Barnabite San Carlo ai Catinari, and the Jesuit complexes of Il Gesu and Sant'Ignazio, including the Andrea Pozzo perspective corridor which leads to the rooms of Saint Ignatius at Il Gesù.



Aqueducts, Streets, Walls with Jan Gadeyne (bus to site)

This tour will focus on the negotiation between architectures of multiple chronologies, with special attention to the interaction of ancient structures and fragments with the modern city. Starting with the Porta Maggiore — the aqueduct hub of ancient Rome — the tour will walk along part of the Aurelian and Republican walls to the Porta Tiburtina and the Porta Esquilina.



The Marra/Moglia Collection and Jewish Ghetto with Shara Wasserman (walking tour)

The collection of Giovanni Moglia and Anna Marra offers a privileged view of blue-chip contemporary Italian art, including the work of Licia Galizia, Pietro Ruffo, Nunzio, Pizzi Cannella, and Staccioli. Housed in their private palazzina in the former Jewish Ghetto, the itinerary includes a tour of the district. The Jewish Museum and Synagogue will also be included.



Cinematic Rome with Carolina Ciampaglia (walking tour)

La Dolce Vita (1960) and La Grande Bellezza (2014) are two well-known films that have greatly contributed to the international reputation of Rome as a site for making films. This tour will include sites that are prominent in one or the other film, such as the Palazzo Spada, Trevi Fountain, Palazzo Barberini, Via Veneto, Villa Medici, and Piazza del Popolo.

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Panelists/Guides

Thank you to everyone who has registered — the response has been overwhelming! Registration is now closed. To be added to the wait list, please contact us via email at aapalum@cornell.edu or phone at (607) 255-7510.

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Panelists

Architecture panel: Rome as ground

Peter Eisenman

Peter Eisenman (B.Arch. '55), an internationally recognized architect and educator, is founder and design principal of Eisenman Architects, an architecture and design office in New York City. The firm has won awards for buildings including the Wexner Center for the Arts and Fine Arts Library at The Ohio State University; the Koizumi Sangyo Corporation headquarters buildi   ng in Tokyo; and in Berlin, the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe and IBA Housing at Checkpoint Charlie. Eisenman has taught Cambridge, Princeton, Harvard, Ohio State, and The Cooper Union in New York City; and received the 2013 AIA New York State Educator's Award for outstanding teaching, the 2015 AIA/ACSA Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architectural Education, and the Piranesi Prix de Rome for career achievement, among others. Currently, he is the Charles Gwathmey Professor in Practice at the Yale University School of Architecture. Eisenman holds a B.Arch. from Cornell University, an M.S. in architecture from Columbia University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Cambridge University.

Kent Kleinman

Kent Kleinman is the Gale and Ira Drukier Dean of the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning at Cornell University. He received his professional degree in architecture from the University of California at Berkeley. His scholarly focus is 20th-century European Modernism, and he is the author of numerous books, articles, and reviews. Kleinman has taught at architecture schools nationally and internationally including the University of Michigan, the State University of New York, Buffalo, the New School in New York, the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, and the ETH in Zurich. He has received numerous grants, prizes, and awards.

Patrik Schumacher 

headshot of Patrik SchumacherPatrik Schumacher is principal of Zaha Hadid Architects and has led the firm since Hadid's passing in March 2016. He joined Zaha Hadid in 1988, has been a coauthor on most projects, and was seminal in developing Zaha Hadid Architects to become a 400-person strong global architecture and design brand. In 1996 he founded the Design Research Laboratory at the Architectural Association where he continues to teach. He has lectured worldwide and recently held the John Portman Chair in Architecture at Harvard GSD. Over the last 20 years, he has contributed more than 100 articles to architectural journals and anthologies. In 2008 he coined the phrase parametricism and has since published a series of manifestos promoting parametricism as the new epochal style for the 21st century. In 2010 and 2012 he published his two-volume theoretical opus magnum, The Autopoiesis of Architecture. He recently guest-edited an issue of Architectural Design titled "Parametricism 2.0," setting architecture's agenda for the 21st century with a new emphasis on the societal relevance of parametricism.

Humanities panel: Reading Buildings, Building Texts

Kimberly Bowes

Kimberly Bowes is the director of the American Academy in Rome and an archaeologist, specializing in the archaeology of late antique religions, domestic architecture, and Roman economics. She received her doctorate from Princeton University. After a post-doctoral fellowship at Yale University from 2002–04, she held assistant professorships at Fordham University and Cornell University and is currently an associate professor in classics at the University of Pennsylvania. Author of more than 35 articles, two books, and two edited volumes, she also runs a major field project on Roman poverty in Tuscany, sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

Thomas J. Campanella

Thomas J. Campanella is an associate professor of city planning at Cornell University and a fellow of the American Academy in Rome.  The recipient of Guggenheim and Fulbright fellowships, he has written for the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal and is the author of The Concrete Dragon: China's Urban Revolution and What It Means for the World, and Republic of Shade: New England and the American Elm — winner of the Spiro Kostof Award from the Society of Architectural Historians.  Campanella divides his time between Ithaca and New York City, where he currently serves as historian-in-residence of the New York City Parks Department.

Michael Kotlikoff

Michael I. Kotlikoff became the 16th provost of Cornell University on August 1, 2015. A member of the Cornell faculty since 2000, he most recently served as the Austin O. Hooey Dean of Veterinary Medicine. As dean (2007–15), Kotlikoff initiated a comprehensive strategic plan to enhance the College of Veterinary Medicine’s programs in education, delivery of animal health care, and research, and he launched an $87 million capital project to upgrade infrastructure and teaching facilities and enable an increase in the pre-clinical class size. Kotlikoff was recruited to Cornell in 2000 from the University of Pennsylvania to become founding chair of the Department of Biomedical Sciences and chair of the Mammalian Genomics Life Science Initiative. Kotlikoff received his B.A. (literature) and V.M.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and his Ph.D. in physiology from the University of California–Davis.

Verity Platt

Verity Platt is an associate professor in the departments of Classics and History of Art at Cornell, where she is also curator of the university's Cast Collection. She is the author of Facing the Gods: Epiphany and Representation in Graeco-Roman Art, Literature and Religion (2011) and coeditor of The Frame in Classical Art: A Cultural History (2017). Her work focuses on the relationship between art and literature, the history of the sacred image, Roman fresco painting, and the historiography of ancient art.

Don Randel

Don Michael Randel is president emeritus of the University of Chicago and of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and is chairman of the board of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was trained as a music historian at Princeton, and in 1968 joined the faculty of the Department of Music at Cornell, where he became dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and provost. His scholarly interests include music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance in Spain and France, as well as Latin-American popular music, Arabic music theory, and the songs of Robert Schumann and of Cole Porter.

Gretchen Ritter

Gretchen Ritter is the Harold Tanner Dean of Arts and Sciences and professor of government in the College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell. She is a scholar on the history of women's Constitutional rights, as well as studies on contemporary issues concerning democracy and citizenship in American politics. Dean Ritter previously served as vice provost and professor of government at UT–Austin, and has taught at MIT, Princeton, and Harvard. She received her B.A. in government from Cornell and a Ph.D. in political science from MIT.

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Expert Guides

Jeffrey Blanchard

Jeffrey Blanchard has taught urban design, architecture, and art in Renaissance and Baroque Rome for more than 20 years. He won a Rome Prize Fellowship to the American Academy (1978–79) and has resided in Rome ever since, where he has dedicated himself principally to teaching and academic administration for American study programs. His institutional affiliations in Rome have included the University of Notre Dame, the Pratt Institute, and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. In 1988 he began teaching courses in Renaissance and Baroque architecture and art for Cornell in Rome. He subsequently became Cornell in Rome's academic and field trip coordinator. Blanchard studied the history of art and architecture at Stanford University (B.A. '73), the Università di Firenze (Fulbright Fellow, '74), and Yale University (M.Phil. '77), specializing in the Italian Renaissance.

Carolina Ciampaglia

Carolina Ciampaglia received her degree in modern languages and literature from the Università La Sapienza Roma, Laurea in 1984. She has taught Italian as a foreign and second language, as well as Italian literature courses for the Rome-based programs of Cornell University, Rhode Island School of Design, Dartmouth College, University of Washington, and the American Academy in Rome. She has also taught Italian cinema for both Cornell in Rome and DePaul University in Rome. Ciampaglia was the administrative director of Italiaidea from 2000 to 2015, as well as the director of academic programs from 2006 to 2015.

Anna Rita Flati

Anna Rita Flati has been part of Cornell in Rome from the first semester in fall 1986 starting at Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne, moving on to Palazzo Lazzaroni in July 1997, and then to Palazzo Santacroce on January 2016. She started by assisting Roberto Einaudi at the inception of the program and became the administrative director in 1994, a position that she is still in. The management of the program in its many aspects is her main duty, but what she prefers is the interaction with the students and their welfare while in Rome.

Jan Gadeyne

Jan Gadeyne has a Ph.D. in archaeology and ancient art history from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Louvain, Belgium). Since 1988 he has been teaching and lecturing for several American abroad programs, including Cornell, Temple, Yale, Pratt, and Miami. For Cornell in Rome, he teaches a class on the urban history and topography of the ancient and medieval city. Along with Gregory Smith, he coedited Perspectives on Public Space in Rome, from Antiquity to the Present Day (2013). Since 2005 he has codirected the excavations on the Piano della Civita in Artena near Rome.

Werner Goehner

A registered architect in Germany, Werner Goehner has been associate director of the Department of Comprehensive Urban Development in Karlsruhe. He has won numerous honors, including a DAAD Fellowship, the Cornell Outstanding Educator Award, and numerous prizes in international professional urban design and museum design competitions, including an invitation to the International Building Exhibition in Berlin. He was recently invited to lecture at conferences in Mumbai, Berlin, and Como. Goehner teaches a third-year undergraduate design studio, conducts a pro-seminar in thesis design research, and has served as the associate dean and director of graduate studies. While teaching in the post-professional graduate program he conducted urban design studios in and about Berlin, New York, Vienna, Detroit, and Mumbai. He directed special Cornell summer programs in Europe, South America, North Africa, South-East Asia, and China. He studied at the Universität Karlsruhe, the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris, and Cornell.

Anna Mascorella

Anna Mascorella is a Ph.D. candidate in the History of Architecture and Urban Development program in Cornell's Department of Architecture. Focused primarily on 20th-century Italy, her work investigates the intersections of politics, visual culture, and the built environment. Her dissertation, "Restoration, Displacement, Appropriation: Negotiating the Baroque Legacy in Fascist Rome," examines the ways in which Italy's Fascist regime negotiated the architectural and sociocultural legacies of the Baroque period in Rome's urban fabric. Mascorella was recently awarded a Luigi Einaudi Graduate Fellowship from the Cornell Institute for European Studies to support her research in Italy.

ALESSIO ROSATI

Born and raised in Rome where, after studying architecture and working for some of the main Italian cultural institutions, Alessio Rosati is currently in charge of cultural events at MAXXI The National Museum of XXI Century Arts. He has taught in several Italian and North American design schools and is now writing short stories on both modern and contemporary forgotten architects, clients, and buildings.

Andrea Simitch

Andrea Simitch is an associate professor in the Department of Architecture at Cornell AAP where she teaches courses in architectural design and architectural representation. She served as director of the Bachelor of Architecture program from 2011–14, as director of undergraduate studies from 2007–08, and as associate dean of AAP from 2002–03. Associate Professor Val Warke and she partner in a collaborative architectural practice and recent projects include the Nalati National Park Resort and the Eco-Tourism Strategic Planning Proposal, both for Nalati, China, as well as numerous design competitions. The Language of Architecture: 26 Principles Every Architect Should Know, a book she coauthored with Warke and published by Rockport Publishers (June 2014), has been translated into five languages, with a Korean edition expected in 2017. She received her B.Arch. from Cornell in 1979 and also attended Occidental College and l'École Spécial d'Architecture in Paris.

Shara Wasserman

Shara Wasserman is an art historian of contemporary art and an independent curator. Following her graduate degree in art history at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University and a period at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, she relocated to Rome. Here she became involved with the contemporary art community, curating exhibitions and publishing essays. She teaches contemporary art at the Temple University Rome Campus and holds the position of director of exhibitions. In 1992 she developed her seminar in contemporary art for the Cornell in Rome program, a class designed to engage the students with Rome's contemporary culture through visits to museums, galleries, and artist studios.

Jerry Wells

Jerry Wells served as chair of Cornell's architecture department for two terms from 1980 to 1989. He is a registered architect in New York, #8993, and with the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, #5955. He has served on the Fulbright Committee, the National Screening Committee for Architecture, and was a member of the board of directors for the National Architectural Accrediting Board. He has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Architectural Education and was a member of the Architects in Education committee of the AIA. Wells recently ran the Solar Decathlon studios at Cornell and was involved in teaching two interdisciplinary seminars for the project. He has a keen interest in industrialized building and solar energy. Wells studied at the University of Texas receiving his B.Arch. in 1959 and at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology-ETH, Zurich, Switzerland from 1960 to 1962.

Mildred Warner

Cities across the world are faced with the challenges of fiscal stress, service delivery restructuring and the imperative to promote economic development. Mildred Warner is an international expert on restructuring local government services, how to plan for more child and age-friendly cities and how to promote environmental sustainability at the local level. Decentralization has elevated the importance of local government worldwide, but social protection is challenged by devolution, privatization, and fiscal crisis. Cities must pick up the slack and Warner's research explores how. She has authored over a hundred journal articles, book chapters, and professional reports, and has received major research grants from government and foundations. Warner works closely with local government, planners, policy analysts, economic developers and union leaders both in the U.S. and abroad. She received her B.A in history from Oberlin College, and her M.S. in agricultural economics and her Ph.D. in development sociology from Cornell.

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Schedule

Thank you to everyone who has registered — the response has been overwhelming! Registration is now closed. To be added to the wait list, please contact us via email at aapalum@cornell.edu or phone at (607) 255-7510.


Schedule is subject to change. Last updated January 11, 2017.

  Saturday,
March 18
Sunday,
March 19
Monday,
March 20
9 a.m. Convene, Sala della Protomoteca (9:45) Convene, various locations Convene, various locations
10 a.m. Architecture panel: Rome as Ground, Sala della Protomoteca Tours: Trastevere, Crypta Balbi, and the Capitoline Museums, among others  Tours: Borromini Buildings, Foro Italico and Appian Way, among others
 
   
1 p.m. Lunch, Palazzo Santacroce Lunch on own Lunch on own
 
3 p.m. Tours: Palazzo Colonna, Campus Martius, Roma Fascista, and Cinematic Rome, among others   Tours: Counter-Reformation Churches, and the Moglia/Marra Collection and Jewish Ghetto among others

 

4 p.m. Humanities panel: Reading Buildings, Building Texts, Villa Aurelia
 
6 p.m.   Reception, Villa Aurelia Closing Reception, Palazzo Massimo
 

Travel Planning

Thank you to everyone who has registered — the response has been overwhelming! Registration is now closed. To be added to the wait list, please contact us via email at aapalum@cornell.edu or phone at (607) 255-7510.

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Travel Information

Please consider working with Humana Fabrica, a full-service tour operator, to book all travel arrangements including international air travel, transportation from and to the airport, and hotel accommodations. This service is provided free of charge to all registrants. Humana Fabrica can also help plan extended travel beyond the Rome celebration.

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Restaurants

Most of the activities are centered around Palazzo Santacroce in the historic district. Here are some restaurant recommendations from Anna Rita Flati, Cornell in Rome's administrative director.

Downtown:

TRASTEVERE / MONTEVERDE:

Ostiense/Testaccio

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Transportation in Rome

From the airport into the city:

  • Taxi: Only use the white taxis that are waiting outside the airport at the taxi line

Around the City:

  • Taxi: It is customary for the hotels to call taxis for their clients. Visitors can also call directly: +39 06 3570 or +39 06 4994. Alternatively, use download the app taxi.it to request taxi service. 
  • Rail: A map of the Rome metro is available here
  • Bus: Visit atac.roma.it to find bus routes and schedules.
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